Culture, Automation, Lean, Measurement and Sharing (CALMS): Balancing DevOps

 11 February, Manchester

DevOps can be traced back to the 1980s when it was introduced to the traditional enterprises then In 2010 Damon Edwards coined the acronym CAMS (Culture, Automation, Measurement and Sharing) which set the core values of the DevOps movement. Then, Jez Humble added Lean to the mix, giving us CALMS.

Culture: Effective teams are essential for the delivery of reliable software and business benefits. 

Automation: This at the core of development to build, test and continuous deployment.

Bringing a high level of automation to development cycles will provide enormous benefits.

Lean: Inbuildingand controlling of systems, agile techniques and Lean practices come into play. Lean testing cycles allow frequent and effective testing which is core for performance.  

Metrics: Measuring success is an important aspect of the feedback process. A successful DevOps implementation should measure performance, process and even people metrics.

Sharing:  Collaboration and optimisation of ideas, stories of problems and success is essential and also the realisation for the teams to treat the problem as an enemy and not each other. Sharing of ideas opens the channels of feedback and so leads to improvement.

DevOps is a process, a journey that organizations will move through at varying speeds and levels of adoption but the evolution depends on rapid adoption, leveraging and internalization of the CALMS concepts. This approach will give the organisation the ability to change to the demands of the business.

Programme

  • -
    Keith-Watson

    Case Study from Ordnance Survey

    Keith Watson, Agile Delivery Manager (Development Support Services) Ordnance Survey

    In 2013, Ordnance Survey embarked on the first steps on its DevOps journey. We realised very early that the adoption of DevOps was not just about use of improved tooling or recruiting DevOps engineers. We initiated a strategy which would enable us to achieve a permanent culture change embedded in the organisation which would provide a better lean service to the organisation and ultimately our external customers. This culture change involved;

    • Showing the pain and cost of the current situation and securing support from senior management to investigate possible solutions.
    • Initiating mutual collaboration within and between operations and software development teams which improved customer satisfaction and a better understanding of our internal customer needs.
    • Adopting automation as a standard practice to improve our service provision and reducing errors caused by manual work practices.
    • Using the power of positive “good” stories early on to overcome the turbulent political waters of cultural resistance caused by historical “bad” experiences and secure investment and support for the DevOps approach using Open Source tooling.
    • Addressing some of the issues with the silo based project DevOps anti-pattern by adopting a lean approach to service provision and improving feedback loops.
    • Demonstrating the business benefits of this approach using financial, project and quality metrics.
    • Building on lean benefits to demonstrate how this has also enable us to respond to additional compliance and governance requirements.

    This has resulted in the Operations being seen by Development as leading the way in terms of DevOps transformation and being invited to participate in future initiatives.”

    Speakers:
    Keith-Watson

    Keith Watson

  • -
    Mike-Shaw

    DevOps : The tools are the easy bit

    Mike Shaw, Director Strategic Marketing, HPE

    Are high level management bought in? Do they know what MVP and experimentation really means for them and their beloved progress reports? Have you achieved a lot of "Dev", with very little “Ops" buyin?  How do you get people to “shift left”? How do you build the trust that DevOps needs in order to work?

    This presentation will look at the “softer” aspects of DevOps - the things that are as important, if not more important, than putting in place the tools and the tool chains that DevOps requires.

    Speakers:
    Mike-Shaw

    Mike Shaw

  • -
    Matthew-Skelton

    Why and how to test logging

    Matthew Skelton, Skelton Thatcher Consulting

    Modern log aggregation & search tools provide significant new capabilities for teams building, testing, and running software systems. By treating logging as a core system component, and using techniques such as unique event IDs, transaction tracing, and structured log output, we gain rich insights into application behaviour and health. This talk explains why it is valuable to test aspects of logging and how to do this with modern log aggregation tooling.

    Speakers:
    Matthew-Skelton

    Matthew Skelton

  • -
    Graham-Parsons

    Why DevOps Usually Fails

    Graham Parsons, Solutions Consultant – DevOps, Dynatrace

    The goals of DevOps are admirable: improve collaboration, stop wasting resources, stop frustrating people, and start building great systems. Unfortunately, they often fail, as when things go wrong, teams fall back into old habits; trapping themselves in Dev vs Ops war rooms. Making DevOps work needs a culture change, fortified by the ability to automate, measure, and share. There needs to be shared understanding and purpose, with everyone empowered. It’s not just a set of tools, or a standard, or something you can buy in a box. Here, we’ll use real-life examples to illustrate common DevOps pitfalls and how CIOs can handle them, helping businesses to unify IT around shared goals.

    Speakers:
    Graham-Parsons

    Graham Parsons

  • -

    Panel: Governance and regulation in DevOps

    All speakers

  • -

    Enabling DevOps: Hyper-Efficient or Grossly Inefficient? What to do with what you have.

    Kenneth Tan, Sardina Systems

    What do you know about how resources are being used in your private cloud environment? How are the resources being managed?

    This presentation will highlight the gross inefficiencies in DevOps infrastructure, and a route to hyper-efficient private cloud.

    Is it impossible to compete with public cloud operators on cost? The answer to this question lies in knowing what to do with what you have. Private cloud operators can achieve more competitive cost level.

    By better managing resources, DevOps teams could increase productivity, and increase overall organizational efficiency. For CFOs and CIOs, the financial impact on improving efficiency could be significant!

  • -
    John-Clapham

    Cultivating Culture: How to nurture an effective culture for DevOps, and a few more things besides.

    John Clapham, Independent Consultant

    Culture is one of the key contributors to organisational success, pervading every project, meeting and conversation. While many recognise what a productive culture looks like, it is one of the most challenging things to create, steer or replicate. Despite this the DevOps movement asks us to challenge our teams even further. This talk shares practical culture building tips, based on years of experience in Agile, DevOps and Continuous Delivery.

    Speakers:
    John-Clapham

    John Clapham

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    Slacking Off: Building A Culture of Sharing with ChatOps

    Jon Topper, The Scale Factory

    Highly Effective DevOps organisations are increasingly using ChatOps to build a generative culture, improve team communication and drive efficiency. We'll take a brief look at how to get started with these tools.

    Speakers:
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    Jon Topper

Speakers

Keith-Watson

Keith Watson

Agile Delivery Manager

Mike-Shaw

Mike Shaw

Director Strategic Marketing, HPE

Matthew-Skelton

Matthew Skelton

Skelton Thatcher Consulting Ltd

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Jon Topper

Linux systems and network specialist

John-Clapham

John Clapham

Cotelic - Coaching and Consulting

Graham-Parsons

Graham Parsons

Dynatrace

Media Partners

Sponsors

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 dynatrace

Organised by:

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Tickets

End Users Organisations

115 GBP
  • Standard Price - after 11 January 2016 £115 +VAT
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Vendors and Consultants

750 GBP
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Event venue

  • Free Trade Hall, Peter St, Manchester M2 5GP
  • 01895 256 484
  • info@unicom.co.uk